Applications for leave to appeal in Moyo and Sonti will be argued this morning in the Pretoria High Court. The case concerns section 1(1)(b) of the Intimidation Act, which General Alfred Moyo and the Centre for Applied Legal Studies are arguing should be declared unconstitutional and invalid.

  • Read SERI's heads of argument here.
  • Read more about the case here.

Lwazi Mtshiyo and Tim Fish Hodgson have written a timely reminder in the Business Day that more than 1500 days after the massacre of 37 striking workers in Marikana, their families and communities have still recieved no apology from the state, or the British mining company, Lonmin. Mtshiyo and Fish Hodgson suggest:

"The massacre has also broken, and will continue to break and bend, complex social cultures in a sudden, painful and inorganic way. Mineworkers were not only breadwinners for their families but often pillars of strength or crucial cogs in their communities. Their loss is felt deeply and widely.

As we commemorate the Sharpeville massacre and its victims, we remember the Marikana massacre and its litany of victims.

It is time for Lonmin and the state to apologise publicly for the Marikana massacre. Any less would be a failure to acknowledge the depth of the harms that have been caused under their watch. Any less would be cheapening the mineworkers and their loved ones’ constitutional rights to human dignity and to be treated with care and concern."

  • Read the full op-ed here.
  • Watch SERI's new short film on bringing the truth about Marikana back to the people to whom it belongs here.

Static Image Day 2

The families of the mineworkers killed at Marikana, mineworkers and members of the Slovo Park Community Development Forum (SPCDF), with the support of the Marikana Support Campaign, are gathered today in Slovo Park to commemorate the Sharpeville and Marikana massacres.

The event includes the launch of a new SERI short film, Bringing the Truth Home. The film highlights the pain and struggles of mineworkers and the victims’ families in the wake of the Farlam Commission of Inquiry report, which was released in June 2015. The event will raise awareness about the slow progress of the state and Lonmin in ensuring that there is justice for the victims of Marikana. The victims’ families have emphasised the depth of the harms done to themselves as dependants and the social fabric in their communities more broadly.

Watch the film below, or on our YouTube channel here.

 

At 9h30 on Human Rights Day, 21 March 2017, families of the mineworkers killed at Marikana, mineworkers and members of the Slovo Park Community Development Forum (SPCDF), with the support of the Marikana Support Campaign, will gather in Slovo Park to commemorate the Sharpeville and Marikana massacres.

 The event will include a screening of Miners Shot Down and the launch of a new SERI short film, Bringing the Truth Home. Bringing the Truth Home highlights the pain and struggles of mineworkers and the victims’ families in the wake of the Farlam Commission of Inquiry report, which was released in June 2015. These screenings will be followed by discussions between the SPCDF and representatives of the mineworkers and the victims’ families.

The event kick starts a week-long campaign to raise awareness about the slow progress of the state and Lonmin in ensuring that there is justice for the victims of Marikana. The victims’ families have emphasised the depth of the harms done to themselves as dependants and the social fabric in their communities more broadly.

This week-long campaign will conclude on 24 March 2017, which also marks the International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims. On this day, SERI will launch a web-archive which brings together a comprehensive set of exhibits and transcripts from the Farlam Commission in a single, easily navigable and freely accessible location.

  • Read the full media alert here.

Static Image Day

On Wednesday 22 March 2017 from 10:30 to 12:30, SERI, in partnership with the South African Informal Traders Forum (SAITF), is launching a new resource guide for informal traders in Johannesburg. The launch will take place at the Gauteng Provincial Legislature (corner of President Street and Harrison Street, Johannesburg). The resource guide is called Informal Trade in Johannesburg: Your Rights. 

Informal traders make a living in hostile environments, and local governments do not protect the rights of people making a living informally in the same way that they do those working in the formal sector. Despite this, informal traders have found novel ways to hold local authorities to account. If traders are aware of their rights and how to protect them, they are better placed to resist illegal harassment and clamp downs on their businesses.

Informal Trade in Johannesburg: Your Rights is a resource guide for informal traders making a living in Johannesburg which spells out what their rights are, and what avenues are available to ensure those rights are protected.

  • Read the full media alert here.

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